Juvenile–adult tree associations in a continental Mediterranean ecosystem: no evidence for sustained and general facilitation at increased aridity

Granda, Elena and Escudero, Adrián and Cruz Rot, Marcelino de la and Valladares Ros, Fernando (2012). Juvenile–adult tree associations in a continental Mediterranean ecosystem: no evidence for sustained and general facilitation at increased aridity. "Journal of Vegetation Science", v. 23 (n. 1); pp. 164-175. ISSN 1654-1103. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1654-1103.2011.01343.x.

Description

Title: Juvenile–adult tree associations in a continental Mediterranean ecosystem: no evidence for sustained and general facilitation at increased aridity
Author/s:
  • Granda, Elena
  • Escudero, Adrián
  • Cruz Rot, Marcelino de la
  • Valladares Ros, Fernando
Item Type: Article
Título de Revista/Publicación: Journal of Vegetation Science
Date: February 2012
ISSN: 1654-1103
Volume: 23
Subjects:
Freetext Keywords: Juniperus thurifera; Pinus nigra; Quercus faginea; Quercus ilex; Regeneration; Spatial patterns; Stress-gradient hypothesis; Water availability
Faculty: E.U.I.T. Agrícolas (UPM)
Department: Biología Vegetal [hasta 2014]
Creative Commons Licenses: Recognition

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Abstract

Question: How do tree species identity, microhabitat and water availability affect inter- and intra-specific interactions between juvenile and adult woody plants? Location: Continental Mediterranean forests in Alto Tajo Natural Park, Guadalajara, Spain. Methods: A total of 2066 juveniles and adults of four co-occurring tree species were mapped in 17 plots. The frequency of juveniles at different microhabitats and water availability levels was analysed using log-linear models. We used nearest-neighbour contingency table analysis of spatial segregation and J-functions to describe the spatial patterns. Results: We found a complex spatial pattern that varied according to species identity and microhabitat. Recruitment was more frequent in gaps for Quercus ilex, while the other three species recruited preferentially under shrubs or trees depending on the water availability level. Juveniles were not spatially associated to conspecific adults, experiencing segregation from them inmany cases. Spatial associations, both positive and negative, were more common at higher water availability levels. Conclusions: Our results do not agree with expectations from the stressgradient hypothesis, suggesting that positive interactions do not increase in importance with increasing aridity in the study ecosystem. Regeneration patterns are species-specific and depend on microhabitat characteristics and dispersal strategies. In general, juveniles do not look for conspecific adult protection. This work contributes to the understanding of species co-existence, proving the importance of considering a multispecies approach at several plots to overcome limitations of simple pair-wise comparisons in a limited number of sites.

More information

Item ID: 10652
DC Identifier: http://oa.upm.es/10652/
OAI Identifier: oai:oa.upm.es:10652
DOI: 10.1111/j.1654-1103.2011.01343.x
Official URL: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1654-1103.2011.01343.x/full
Deposited by: PTU Marcelino De la Cruz Rot
Deposited on: 09 Apr 2012 08:43
Last Modified: 20 Apr 2016 18:54
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