Pyramidal cells in prefrontal cortex: comparative observations reveal unparalleled specializations in neuronal structure among primate species

Elston, Guy N. and Benavides-Piccione, Ruth and Elston, Alejandra and Manger, Paul R. and Felipe Oroquieta, Javier de (2011). Pyramidal cells in prefrontal cortex: comparative observations reveal unparalleled specializations in neuronal structure among primate species. "Frontiers Neuroanatomy" (n. 5); p. 2. ISSN 978-0-12-372559-2. https://doi.org/10.3389/fnana.2011.00002.

Description

Title: Pyramidal cells in prefrontal cortex: comparative observations reveal unparalleled specializations in neuronal structure among primate species
Author/s:
  • Elston, Guy N.
  • Benavides-Piccione, Ruth
  • Elston, Alejandra
  • Manger, Paul R.
  • Felipe Oroquieta, Javier de
Item Type: Article
Título de Revista/Publicación: Frontiers Neuroanatomy
Date: February 2011
ISSN: 978-0-12-372559-2
Subjects:
Faculty: E.T.S.I. y Sistemas de Telecomunicación (UPM)
Department: Sistemas Electrónicos y de Control [hasta 2014]
Creative Commons Licenses: Recognition - No derivative works - Non commercial

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Abstract

The most ubiquitous neuron in the cerebral cortex, the pyramidal cell, is characterized by markedly different dendritic structure among different cortical areas. The complex pyramidal cell phenotype in granular prefrontal cortex (gPFC) of higher primates endows specific biophysical properties and patterns of connectivity, which differ from those in other cortical regions. However, within the gPFC, data have been sampled from only a select few cortical areas. The gPFC of species such as human and macaque monkey includes more than 10 cortical areas. It remains unknown as to what degree pyramidal cell structure may vary among these cortical areas. Here we undertook a survey of pyramidal cells in the dorsolateral, medial, and orbital gPFC of cercopithecid primates. We found marked heterogeneity in pyramidal cell structure within and between these regions. Moreover, trends for gradients in neuronal complexity varied among species. As the structure of neurons determines their computational abilities, memory storage capacity and connectivity, we propose that these specializations in the pyramidal cell phenotype are an important determinant of species-specific executive cortical functions in primates.

More information

Item ID: 13669
DC Identifier: http://oa.upm.es/13669/
OAI Identifier: oai:oa.upm.es:13669
DOI: 10.3389/fnana.2011.00002
Official URL: http://www.frontiersin.org/Neuroanatomy/10.3389/fnana.2011.00002/abstract
Deposited by: Memoria Investigacion
Deposited on: 10 Oct 2012 11:01
Last Modified: 07 Apr 2019 09:52
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