Evolution not revolution of farming systemswill best feed and green the world

Connor, D.J. and Minguez Tudela, Maria Ines (2012). Evolution not revolution of farming systemswill best feed and green the world. "Global Food Security", v. 1 (n. 2); pp. 106-113. ISSN 2211-9124. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.gfs.2012.10.004.

Description

Title: Evolution not revolution of farming systemswill best feed and green the world
Author/s:
  • Connor, D.J.
  • Minguez Tudela, Maria Ines
Item Type: Article
Título de Revista/Publicación: Global Food Security
Date: December 2012
ISSN: 2211-9124
Volume: 1
Subjects:
Faculty: E.T.S.I. Agrónomos (UPM) [antigua denominación]
Department: Producción Vegetal: Fitotecnia [hasta 2014]
Creative Commons Licenses: Recognition - No derivative works - Non commercial

Full text

[img]
Preview
PDF - Requires a PDF viewer, such as GSview, Xpdf or Adobe Acrobat Reader
Download (8MB) | Preview

Abstract

The challenge to properly feed a world population of 9.2 billion by 2050, that must be achieved on essentially currently cropped area, requires that food production be increased by 70%. This large increase can only be achieved by combinations of greater crop yields and more intensive cropping adapted to local conditions and availability of inputs. Farming systems are dynamic and continuously adapt to changing ecological, environmental and social conditions, while achieving greater production and resource-use efficiency by application of science and technology. This article argues that the solution to feed and green the world in 2050 is to support this evolution more strongly by providing farmers with necessary information, inputs, and recognition. There is no revolutionary alternative. Proposals to transform agriculture to low-input and organic systems would, because of low productiv- ity, exacerbate the challenge if applied in small part, and ensure failure if applied more widely. The challenge is, however, great. Irrigation, necessary to increase cropping intensity in many areas cannot be extended much more widely than at present, and it is uncertain if the current rate of crop yield increase can be maintained. Society needs greater recognition of the food-supply problem and must increase funding and support for agricultural research while it attends to issues of food waste and over consumption that can make valuable reductions to food demand from agriculture

More information

Item ID: 15889
DC Identifier: http://oa.upm.es/15889/
OAI Identifier: oai:oa.upm.es:15889
DOI: 10.1016/j.gfs.2012.10.004
Official URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2211912412000193
Deposited by: Memoria Investigacion
Deposited on: 21 Jun 2013 15:21
Last Modified: 21 Apr 2016 16:12
  • Logo InvestigaM (UPM)
  • Logo GEOUP4
  • Logo Open Access
  • Open Access
  • Logo Sherpa/Romeo
    Check whether the anglo-saxon journal in which you have published an article allows you to also publish it under open access.
  • Logo Dulcinea
    Check whether the spanish journal in which you have published an article allows you to also publish it under open access.
  • Logo de Recolecta
  • Logo del Observatorio I+D+i UPM
  • Logo de OpenCourseWare UPM