Sequential origin in the high performance properties of spider dragline silk

Blackledge, Todd A and Pérez Rigueiro, José and Plaza Baonza, Gustavo Ramón and Perea Abarca, Gracia Belén and Navarro, Andrés and Guinea Tortuero, Gustavo V. and Elices Calafat, Manuel (2012). Sequential origin in the high performance properties of spider dragline silk. "Scientific Reports", v. 2 (n. 782); pp. 1-5. ISSN 2045-2322. https://doi.org/10.1038/srep00782.

Description

Title: Sequential origin in the high performance properties of spider dragline silk
Author/s:
  • Blackledge, Todd A
  • Pérez Rigueiro, José
  • Plaza Baonza, Gustavo Ramón
  • Perea Abarca, Gracia Belén
  • Navarro, Andrés
  • Guinea Tortuero, Gustavo V.
  • Elices Calafat, Manuel
Item Type: Article
Título de Revista/Publicación: Scientific Reports
Date: October 2012
ISSN: 2045-2322
Volume: 2
Subjects:
Faculty: E.T.S.I. Caminos, Canales y Puertos (UPM)
Department: Ciencia de los Materiales
Creative Commons Licenses: Recognition - No derivative works - Non commercial

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Abstract

Major ampullate (MA) dragline silk supports spider orb webs, combining strength and extensibility in the toughest biomaterial. MA silk evolved ~376 MYA and identifying how evolutionary changes in proteins influenced silk mechanics is crucial for biomimetics, but is hindered by high spinning plasticity. We use supercontraction to remove that variation and characterize MA silk across the spider phylogeny. We show that mechanical performance is conserved within, but divergent among, major lineages, evolving in correlation with discrete changes in proteins. Early MA silk tensile strength improved rapidly with the origin of GGX amino acid motifs and increased repetitiveness. Tensile strength then maximized in basal entelegyne spiders, ~230 MYA. Toughness subsequently improved through increased extensibility within orb spiders, coupled with the origin of a novel protein (MaSp2). Key changes in MA silk proteins therefore correlate with the sequential evolution high performance orb spider silk and could aid design of biomimetic fibers.

More information

Item ID: 16287
DC Identifier: http://oa.upm.es/16287/
OAI Identifier: oai:oa.upm.es:16287
DOI: 10.1038/srep00782
Official URL: http://www.nature.com/srep/2012/121029/srep00782/full/srep00782.html
Deposited by: Memoria Investigacion
Deposited on: 23 Oct 2013 11:08
Last Modified: 21 Apr 2016 16:35
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