Survival and long-term maintenance of tertiary trees in the Iberian Peninsula during the Pleistocene. First record of Aesculus L.

Postigo Mijarra, Jose Maria and Gómez Manzaneque, Fernando and Morla Juaristi, Carlos (2008). Survival and long-term maintenance of tertiary trees in the Iberian Peninsula during the Pleistocene. First record of Aesculus L.. "Vegetation History and Archaeobotany", v. 17 (n. 4); pp. 351-364. ISSN 0939-6314. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00334-007-0130-x.

Description

Title: Survival and long-term maintenance of tertiary trees in the Iberian Peninsula during the Pleistocene. First record of Aesculus L.
Author/s:
  • Postigo Mijarra, Jose Maria
  • Gómez Manzaneque, Fernando
  • Morla Juaristi, Carlos
Item Type: Article
Título de Revista/Publicación: Vegetation History and Archaeobotany
Date: July 2008
Volume: 17
Subjects:
Freetext Keywords: Aesculus _ Pleistocene _ Iberian Peninsula _ Fossil wood _ Quaternary refugia.
Faculty: E.T.S.I. Montes (UPM)
Department: Silvopascicultura [hasta 2014]
Creative Commons Licenses: Recognition - No derivative works - Non commercial

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Abstract

The Italian and Balkan peninsulas have been places traditionally highlighted as Pleistocene glacial refuges. The Iberian Peninsula, however, has been a focus of controversy between geobotanists and palaeobotanists as a result of its exclusion from this category on different occasions. In the current paper, we synthesise geological, molecular, palaeobotanical and geobotanical data that show the importance of the Iberian Peninsula in the Western Mediterranean as a refugium area. The presence of Aesculus aff. hippocastanum L. at the Iberian site at Cal Guardiola (Tarrasa, Barcelona, NE Spain) in the Lower– Middle Pleistocene transition helps to consolidate the remarkable role of the Iberian Peninsula in the survival of tertiary species during the Pleistocene. The palaeodistribution of the genus in Europe highlights a model of area abandonment for a widely-distributed species in the Miocene and Pliocene, leading to a diminished and fragmentary presence in the Pleistocene and Holocene on the southern Mediterranean peninsulas. Aesculus fossils are not uncommon within the series of Tertiary taxa. Many appear in the Pliocene and suffer a radical impoverishment in the Lower–Middle Pleistocene transition. Nonetheless some of these tertiary taxa persisted throughout the Pleistocene and Holocene up to the present in the Iberian Peninsula. Locating these refuge areas on the Peninsula is not an easy task, although areas characterised by a sustained level of humidity must have played an predominant role.

More information

Item ID: 2568
DC Identifier: http://oa.upm.es/2568/
OAI Identifier: oai:oa.upm.es:2568
DOI: 10.1007/s00334-007-0130-x
Official URL: http://www.springerlink.com/content/e007641m64h34082/?p=4aa656b605a14e2da1bbda35363be494&pi=2
Deposited by: Memoria Investigacion
Deposited on: 17 Mar 2010 09:47
Last Modified: 20 Apr 2016 12:13
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