Root trenching: a useful tool to estimate autotrophic soil respiration? A case study in an Austrian mountain forest

Díaz Pinés, Eugenio and Schindlbacher, Andreas and Pfeffer, Michael and Jandl, Robert and Zechmeister-Boltenstern, Sophie and Rubio Sánchez, Agustín (2010). Root trenching: a useful tool to estimate autotrophic soil respiration? A case study in an Austrian mountain forest. "European Journal of Forest Research", v. 125 (n. 1); pp. 101-109. ISSN 1612-4669. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10342-008-0250-6.

Description

Title: Root trenching: a useful tool to estimate autotrophic soil respiration? A case study in an Austrian mountain forest
Author/s:
  • Díaz Pinés, Eugenio
  • Schindlbacher, Andreas
  • Pfeffer, Michael
  • Jandl, Robert
  • Zechmeister-Boltenstern, Sophie
  • Rubio Sánchez, Agustín
Item Type: Article
Título de Revista/Publicación: European Journal of Forest Research
Date: January 2010
ISSN: 1612-4669
Volume: 125
Subjects:
Freetext Keywords: Trenching • Soil CO2 eZux • Rhizosphere •Autotrophic respiration • Heterotrophic respiration •Win-Rhizo • PLFAs • Fine root decomposition
Faculty: E.T.S.I. Montes (UPM)
Department: Silvopascicultura [hasta 2014]
Creative Commons Licenses: Recognition - No derivative works - Non commercial

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Abstract

We conducted a trenching experiment in a mountain forest in order to assess the contribution of theautotrophic respiration to total soil respiration and evaluate trenching as a technique to achieve it. We hypothesised that the trenching experiment would alter both microbial biomass and microbial community structure and that Wne roots (less than 2 mm diameter) would be decomposed within one growing season. Soil CO2 eZux was measured roughlybiweekly over two growing seasons. Root presence and morphology parameters, as well as the soil microbial community were measured prior to trenching, 5 and 15 months after trenching. The trenched plots emitted about 20 and 30% less CO2 than the control plots in the Wrst and secondgrowing season, respectively. Roots died in trenched plots, but root decay was slow. After 5 and 15 months, Wne root biomass was decreased by 9% (not statistically diferent)and 30%, (statistically diVerent) respectively. When wecorrected for the additional trenched-plot CO2 eZux due to Wne root decomposition, the autotrophic soil respiration rose to »26% of the total soil respiration for the Wrst growing season, and to »44% for the second growing season.Soil microbial biomass and community structure was not altered by the end of the second growing season. We conclude that trenching can give accurate estimates of the autotrophic and heterotrophic components of soil respiration, ifmethodological side eVects are accounted for, only.

More information

Item ID: 2934
DC Identifier: http://oa.upm.es/2934/
OAI Identifier: oai:oa.upm.es:2934
DOI: 10.1007/s10342-008-0250-6
Official URL: http://www.springerlink.com/content/d7725848615g6837/fulltext.pdf
Deposited by: Memoria Investigacion
Deposited on: 06 May 2010 09:04
Last Modified: 20 Apr 2016 12:33
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