Drug polyconsumption is associated with increased synchronization of brain electrical-activity at rest and in a counting task

Coullaut-Valera, Rafael and Arbaiza Díaz del Río, Iria and Bajo Breton, Ricardo and Arrúe Ruiloba, Ricardo de and López García, María Eugenia and Coullaut-Valera, Juan and Correas Marín, Ángeles and López Sanz, David and Maestú Unturbe, Fernando and Papo, David (2014). Drug polyconsumption is associated with increased synchronization of brain electrical-activity at rest and in a counting task. "International Journal of Neural Systems", v. 24 (n. 1); pp. 1-13. ISSN 0129-0657. https://doi.org/10.1142/S0129065714500051.

Description

Title: Drug polyconsumption is associated with increased synchronization of brain electrical-activity at rest and in a counting task
Author/s:
  • Coullaut-Valera, Rafael
  • Arbaiza Díaz del Río, Iria
  • Bajo Breton, Ricardo
  • Arrúe Ruiloba, Ricardo de
  • López García, María Eugenia
  • Coullaut-Valera, Juan
  • Correas Marín, Ángeles
  • López Sanz, David
  • Maestú Unturbe, Fernando
  • Papo, David
Item Type: Article
Título de Revista/Publicación: International Journal of Neural Systems
Date: February 2014
ISSN: 0129-0657
Volume: 24
Subjects:
Freetext Keywords: Addiction; polydrug use; EEG; resting state; synchronization; functional connectivity
Faculty: Centro de Tecnología Biomédica (CTB) (UPM)
Department: Tecnología Fotónica y Bioingeniería
Creative Commons Licenses: Recognition - No derivative works - Non commercial

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Abstract

Drug abusers typically consume not just one but several types of drugs, starting from alcohol and marijuana consumption, and then dramatically lapsing into addiction to harder drugs, such as cocaine, heroin, or amphetamine. The brain of drug abusers presents various structural and neurophysiological abnormalities, some of which may predate drug consumption onset. However, how these changes translate into modifications in functional brain connectivity is still poorly understood. To characterize functional connectivity patterns, we recorded Electroencephalogram (EEG) activity from 21 detoxified drug abusers and 20 age-matched control subjects performing a simple counting task and at rest activity. To evaluate the cortical brain connectivity network we applied the Synchronization Likelihood algorithm. The results showed that drug abusers had higher synchronization levels at low frequencies, mainly in the θ band (4–8 Hz) between frontal and posterior cortical regions. During the counting task, patients showed increased synchronization in the β (14–35 Hz), and γ (35–45 Hz) frequency bands, in fronto-posterior and interhemispheric temporal regions. Taken together 'slow-down' at rest and task-related 'over-exertion' could indicate that the brain of drug abusers is suffering from a premature form of ageing. Future studies will clarify whether this condition can be reversed following prolonged periods of abstinence.

More information

Item ID: 35569
DC Identifier: http://oa.upm.es/35569/
OAI Identifier: oai:oa.upm.es:35569
DOI: 10.1142/S0129065714500051
Official URL: http://www.worldscientific.com/doi/abs/10.1142/S0129065714500051
Deposited by: Memoria Investigacion
Deposited on: 24 Apr 2017 16:06
Last Modified: 24 Apr 2017 16:06
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