Random positioning of dendritic spines in the human cerebral cortex

Morales del Olmo, Juan and Benavides Piccione, Ruth and Dar, Mor and Fernaud Espinosa, Isabel and Rodríguez Martínez Bartolomé, Ángel and Antón Sánchez, Laura and Bielza Lozoya, María Concepción and Larrañaga Múgica, Pedro María and Felipe Oroquieta, Javier de and Yuste, Rafael (2014). Random positioning of dendritic spines in the human cerebral cortex. "Journal of Neuroscience", v. 34 (n. 30); pp. 10078-10084. ISSN 0270-6474. https://doi.org/10.1523/JNEUROSCI.1085-14.2014.

Description

Title: Random positioning of dendritic spines in the human cerebral cortex
Author/s:
  • Morales del Olmo, Juan
  • Benavides Piccione, Ruth
  • Dar, Mor
  • Fernaud Espinosa, Isabel
  • Rodríguez Martínez Bartolomé, Ángel
  • Antón Sánchez, Laura
  • Bielza Lozoya, María Concepción
  • Larrañaga Múgica, Pedro María
  • Felipe Oroquieta, Javier de
  • Yuste, Rafael
Item Type: Article
Título de Revista/Publicación: Journal of Neuroscience
Date: 2014
Volume: 34
Subjects:
Freetext Keywords: Fourier; Lucifer; intracellular injections; pyramidal cells; spatial distribution
Faculty: E.T.S. de Ingenieros Informáticos (UPM)
Department: Inteligencia Artificial
Creative Commons Licenses: Recognition - No derivative works - Non commercial

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Abstract

Dendritic spines establish most excitatory synapses in the brain and are located in Purkinje cell?s dendrites along helical paths, perhaps maximizing the probability to contact different axons. To test whether spine helixes also occur in neocortex, we reconstructed ?500 dendritic segments from adult human cortex obtained from autopsies. With Fourier analysis and spatial statistics, we analyzed spine position along apical and basal dendrites of layer 3 pyramidal neurons from frontal, temporal, and cingulate cortex. Although we occasionally detected helical positioning, for the great majority of dendrites we could not reject the null hypothesis of spatial randomness in spine locations, either in apical or basal dendrites, in neurons of different cortical areas or among spines of different volumes and lengths. We conclude that in adult human neocortex spine positions are mostly random. We discuss the relevance of these results for spine formation and plasticity and their functional impact for cortical circuits.

More information

Item ID: 45645
DC Identifier: http://oa.upm.es/45645/
OAI Identifier: oai:oa.upm.es:45645
DOI: 10.1523/JNEUROSCI.1085-14.2014
Official URL: http://www.jneurosci.org/content/34/30/10078/tab-article-info
Deposited by: Memoria Investigacion
Deposited on: 30 Oct 2017 11:35
Last Modified: 30 Oct 2017 11:35
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