Action boosts episodic memory encoding in humans via engagement of a noradrenergic system

Yebra Granados, María del Mar and Galarza Vallejo, Ana and Soto León, Vanesa and González Rosa, Javier J. and Berker, Archy O. de and Bestmann, Sven and Oliviero, Antonio and Kroes, Marijn C.W. and Strange, Bryan (2019). Action boosts episodic memory encoding in humans via engagement of a noradrenergic system. "Nature Communications", v. 10 (n. 3534); pp. 1-12. ISSN 2041-1723. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41467-019-11358-8.

Description

Title: Action boosts episodic memory encoding in humans via engagement of a noradrenergic system
Author/s:
  • Yebra Granados, María del Mar
  • Galarza Vallejo, Ana
  • Soto León, Vanesa
  • González Rosa, Javier J.
  • Berker, Archy O. de
  • Bestmann, Sven
  • Oliviero, Antonio
  • Kroes, Marijn C.W.
  • Strange, Bryan
Item Type: Article
Título de Revista/Publicación: Nature Communications
Date: 6 August 2019
ISSN: 2041-1723
Volume: 10
Subjects:
Faculty: E.T.S.I. Telecomunicación (UPM)
Department: Tecnología Fotónica y Bioingeniería
Creative Commons Licenses: Recognition - No derivative works - Non commercial

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Abstract

We are constantly interacting with our environment whilst we encode memories. However, how actions influence memory formation remains poorly understood. Goal-directed movement engages the locus coeruleus (LC), the main source of noradrenaline in the brain. Noradrenaline is also known to enhance episodic encoding, suggesting that action could improve memory via LC engagement. Here we demonstrate, across seven experiments, that action (Go-response) enhances episodic encoding for stimuli unrelated to the action itself, compared to action inhibition (NoGo). Functional magnetic resonance imaging, and pupil diameter as a proxy measure for LC-noradrenaline transmission, indicate increased encodingrelated LC activity during action. A final experiment, replicated in two independent samples, confirmed a novel prediction derived from these data that emotionally aversive stimuli, which recruit the noradrenergic system, modulate the mnemonic advantage conferred by Goresponses relative to neutral stimuli. We therefore provide converging evidence that action boosts episodic memory encoding via a noradrenergic mechanism.

Funding Projects

TypeCodeAcronymLeaderTitle
Government of SpainSAF2011-27766UnspecifiedUnspecifiedEstudio de los efectos de la emoción sobre la cognición humana
Government of SpainSAF2015-65982-RUnspecifiedUnspecifiedAumento de memoria en seres humanos mediante estimulación cerebral profunda del núcleo accumbens
FP7304248EMOTIONCOGUNIVERSIDAD POLITECNICA DE MADRIDExploring the Effects of Emotion on Human Cognition
Horizon 2020819814RememberExUNIVERSIDAD POLITECNICA DE MADRIDHuman Subcortical-Cortical Circuit Dynamics for Remembering the Exceptional

More information

Item ID: 63170
DC Identifier: http://oa.upm.es/63170/
OAI Identifier: oai:oa.upm.es:63170
DOI: 10.1038/s41467-019-11358-8
Official URL: https://www.nature.com/articles/s41467-019-11358-8
Deposited by: Memoria Investigacion
Deposited on: 26 Sep 2020 08:10
Last Modified: 26 Sep 2020 08:10
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