Engineering Human-Scale Artificial Bone Grafts for Treating Critical-Size Bone Defects

Cianciosi, Alejandro and Costantini, Marco and Bergamasco, Sara and Testa, Stefano and Fornetti, Ersilia and Jaroszewicz, Jakub and Baldi, Jacopo and Latini, Alessandro and Choińska, Emilia and Heljak, Marcin and Zoccali, Carmine and Cannata, Stefano and Święszkowski, Wojciech and Díaz Lantada, Andrés and Gargioli, Cesare and Barbetta, Andrea (2019). Engineering Human-Scale Artificial Bone Grafts for Treating Critical-Size Bone Defects. "ACS Applied Biomaterials", v. 2 (n. 11); pp. 4275-5215. ISSN 2576-6422. https://doi.org/10.1021/acsabm.9b00756.

Description

Title: Engineering Human-Scale Artificial Bone Grafts for Treating Critical-Size Bone Defects
Author/s:
  • Cianciosi, Alejandro
  • Costantini, Marco
  • Bergamasco, Sara
  • Testa, Stefano
  • Fornetti, Ersilia
  • Jaroszewicz, Jakub
  • Baldi, Jacopo
  • Latini, Alessandro
  • Choińska, Emilia
  • Heljak, Marcin
  • Zoccali, Carmine
  • Cannata, Stefano
  • Święszkowski, Wojciech
  • Díaz Lantada, Andrés
  • Gargioli, Cesare
  • Barbetta, Andrea
Item Type: Article
Título de Revista/Publicación: ACS Applied Biomaterials
Date: 18 November 2019
ISSN: 2576-6422
Volume: 2
Subjects:
Freetext Keywords: bone tissue engineering; critical size bone defects; laser stereolithography; composite scaffolds; foams; mesenchymal stem cells
Faculty: E.T.S.I. Industriales (UPM)
Department: Ingeniería Mecánica
Creative Commons Licenses: Recognition - No derivative works - Non commercial

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Abstract

The manufacturing of artificial bone grafts can potentially circumvent the issues associated with current bone grafting treatments for critical-size bone defects caused by pathological disorders, trauma, or massive tumor ablation. In this study, we report on a potentially patient-specific fabrication process in which replicas of bone defects, in particular zygomatic and mandibular bones and phalanxes of a hand finger, were manufactured by laser stereolithography and used as templates for the creation of PDMS molds. Gas-in-water foams were cast in the molds, rapidly frozen, freeze-dried, and cross-linked. Since bone matrix consists essentially of collagen and hydroxyapatite, biomimetic scaffolds were fabricated using gelatin and hydroxyapatite in a ratio very similar to that found in bone. The obtained composite scaffolds were excellent replicas of the original bone defects models and presented both a superficial and internal porous texture adequate for cellular and blood vessels infiltration. In particular, scaffolds exhibited a porous texture consisting of pores and interconnects with average size of about 300 and 100 μm, respectively, and a porosity of 90%. In vitro culture tests using hMSCs demonstrated scaffold biocompatibility and capacity in inducing differentiation toward osteoblasts progenitors. In vivo cellularized implants showed bone matrix deposition and recruitment of blood vessels. Overall, the technique/materials combination used in this work led to the fabrication of promising mechanically stable, bioactive, and biocompatible composite scaffolds with well-defined architectures potentially valuable in the regeneration of patient-specific bone defects.

More information

Item ID: 63867
DC Identifier: http://oa.upm.es/63867/
OAI Identifier: oai:oa.upm.es:63867
DOI: 10.1021/acsabm.9b00756
Official URL: https://pubs.acs.org/doi/10.1021/acsabm.9b00756
Deposited by: Memoria Investigacion
Deposited on: 12 Nov 2020 16:25
Last Modified: 12 Nov 2020 16:25
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