Older adults exhibit a more pronounced modulation of beta oscillations when performing sustained and dynamic handgrips

Xifra Porxas, Alba and Niso Galán, Julia Guiomar and Larivière, Sara and Kassinopoulos, Michalis and Baillet, Sylvain and Mitsis, Georgios D. and Boudrias, Marie Helene (2019). Older adults exhibit a more pronounced modulation of beta oscillations when performing sustained and dynamic handgrips. "Neuroimage", v. 201 (n. 116037); pp. 1-14. ISSN 1053-8119. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neuroimage.2019.116037.

Description

Title: Older adults exhibit a more pronounced modulation of beta oscillations when performing sustained and dynamic handgrips
Author/s:
  • Xifra Porxas, Alba
  • Niso Galán, Julia Guiomar
  • Larivière, Sara
  • Kassinopoulos, Michalis
  • Baillet, Sylvain
  • Mitsis, Georgios D.
  • Boudrias, Marie Helene
Item Type: Article
Título de Revista/Publicación: Neuroimage
Date: 19 July 2019
ISSN: 1053-8119
Volume: 201
Subjects:
Freetext Keywords: MEG; Beta oscillations; Motor control; Handgrips; Aging
Faculty: E.T.S.I. Telecomunicación (UPM)
Department: Otro
Creative Commons Licenses: Recognition - No derivative works - Non commercial

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Abstract

Muscle contractions are associated with a decrease in beta oscillatory activity, known as movement-related beta desynchronization (MRBD). Older adults exhibit a MRBD of greater amplitude compared to their younger counterparts, even though their beta power remains higher both at rest and during muscle contractions. Further, a modulation in MRBD has been observed during sustained and dynamic pinch contractions, whereby beta activity during periods of steady contraction following a dynamic contraction is elevated. However, how the modulation of MRBD is affected by aging has remained an open question. In the present work, we investigated the effect of aging on the modulation of beta oscillations and their putative link with motor performance. We collected magnetoencephalography (MEG) data from younger and older adults during a resting-state period and motor handgrip paradigms, which included sustained and dynamic contractions, to quantify spontaneous and motor-related beta oscillatory activity. Beta power at rest was found to be significantly increased in the motor cortex of older adults. During dynamic hand contractions, MRBD was more pronounced in older participants in frontal, premotor and motor brain regions. These brain areas also exhibited age-related decreases in cortical thickness; however, the magnitude of MRBD and cortical thickness were not found to be associated after controlling for age. During sustained hand contractions, MRBD exhibited a decrease in magnitude compared to dynamic contraction periods in both groups and did not show age-related differences. This suggests that the amplitude change in MRBD between dynamic and sustained contractions is larger in older compared to younger adults. We further probed for a relationship between beta oscillations and motor behaviour and found that greater MRBD in primary motor cortices was related to degraded motor performance beyond age, but our results suggested that age-related differences in beta oscillations were not predictive of motor performance.

More information

Item ID: 64279
DC Identifier: http://oa.upm.es/64279/
OAI Identifier: oai:oa.upm.es:64279
DOI: 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2019.116037
Official URL: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1053811919306184
Deposited by: Memoria Investigacion
Deposited on: 10 Oct 2020 10:06
Last Modified: 10 Oct 2020 10:06
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