Explicit processing of verbal and spatial features during letter-location binding modulates oscillatory activity of a fronto-parietal network.

Poch, Claudia and Campo, Pablo and Parmentier, Fabrice B.R. and Ruiz Vargas, Jose Maria and Elsley, Jane V. and Perales Castellanos, Nazareth and Maestú, Fernando and Pozo Guerrero, Francisco del (2010). Explicit processing of verbal and spatial features during letter-location binding modulates oscillatory activity of a fronto-parietal network.. "Neuropsychologia", v. 48 (n. 13); pp. 3846-3854. ISSN 0028-3932. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2010.09.01.

Description

Title: Explicit processing of verbal and spatial features during letter-location binding modulates oscillatory activity of a fronto-parietal network.
Author/s:
  • Poch, Claudia
  • Campo, Pablo
  • Parmentier, Fabrice B.R.
  • Ruiz Vargas, Jose Maria
  • Elsley, Jane V.
  • Perales Castellanos, Nazareth
  • Maestú, Fernando
  • Pozo Guerrero, Francisco del
Item Type: Article
Título de Revista/Publicación: Neuropsychologia
Date: November 2010
ISSN: 0028-3932
Volume: 48
Subjects:
Freetext Keywords: Binding; Working memory; Episodic buffer; Oscillatory activity; Prefrontal cortex; Magnetoencephalography
Faculty: E.T.S.I. Telecomunicación (UPM)
Department: Tecnología Fotónica [hasta 2014]
Creative Commons Licenses: Recognition - No derivative works - Non commercial

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Abstract

The present study investigated the binding of verbal and spatial features in immediate memory. In a recent study, we demonstrated incidental and asymmetrical letter-location binding effects when participants attended to letter features (but not when they attended to location features) that were associated with greater oscillatory activity over prefrontal and posterior regions during the retention period. We were interested to investigate whether the patterns of brain activity associated with the incidental binding of letters and locations observed when only the verbal feature is attended differ from those reflecting the binding resulting from the controlled/explicit processing of both verbal and spatial features. To achieve this, neural activity was recorded using magnetoencephalography (MEG) while participants performed two working memory tasks. Both tasks were identical in terms of their perceptual characteristics and only differed with respect to the task instructions. One of the tasks required participants to process both letters and locations. In the other, participants were instructed to memorize only the letters, regardless of their location. Time–frequency representation of MEG data based on the wavelet transform of the signals was calculated on a single trial basis during the maintenance period of both tasks. Critically, despite equivalent behavioural binding effects in both tasks, single and dual feature encoding relied on different neuroanatomical and neural oscillatory correlates. We propose that enhanced activation of an anterior–posterior dorsal network observed in the task requiring the processing of both features reflects the necessity for allocating greater resources to intentionally process verbal and spatial features in this task.

More information

Item ID: 8594
DC Identifier: http://oa.upm.es/8594/
OAI Identifier: oai:oa.upm.es:8594
DOI: 10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2010.09.01
Official URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/journal/00283932
Deposited by: Memoria Investigacion
Deposited on: 10 Aug 2011 08:29
Last Modified: 27 Apr 2016 11:13
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