Contemporary light vaults in Colombia: the origin of a modern tradition

García Muñoz, Julián and Magdalena Layos, Fernando and Medina del Rio, Juan Manuel (2018). Contemporary light vaults in Colombia: the origin of a modern tradition. In: "6th International Congress on Construction History (6ICCH 2018)", 9-13 jul 2018, Bruselas, Bélgica. ISBN 978-1-138-58414-3. pp. 235-244. https://doi.org/10.1201/9780429506208-33.

Description

Title: Contemporary light vaults in Colombia: the origin of a modern tradition
Author/s:
  • García Muñoz, Julián
  • Magdalena Layos, Fernando
  • Medina del Rio, Juan Manuel
Item Type: Presentation at Congress or Conference (Article)
Event Title: 6th International Congress on Construction History (6ICCH 2018)
Event Dates: 9-13 jul 2018
Event Location: Bruselas, Bélgica
Title of Book: Building knowledge, constructing histories
Date: 2018
ISBN: 978-1-138-58414-3
Subjects:
Faculty: E.T.S. de Edificación (UPM)
Department: Construcciones Arquitectónicas y su Control
Creative Commons Licenses: Recognition - No derivative works - Non commercial

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Abstract

Le Corbusier designed tile vaults for the structures of several buildings in the 1950s, yet he on-ly built two: the ones in the Maisons Sarabhai (Ahmadabad 1955) and Jaoul (Paris 1955). Le Corbusier’s vaults were later very influential, mainly in Latin America, where they became the inspiration for numerous buildings in the middle decades of the 20th century. However, little is known about the fact that the main in-spiration for Le Corbusier’s vaults is a demolished Colombian building, the home of local architect Francisco Pizano de Brigard. The Casa Pizano was just one of the many modern Latin American vaulted houses built in those years –some of them using tile vaults. Many of these constructions were previous to the ones raised by Le Corbusier, so it seems only logical to think that the Maisons Sarabhai and Jaoul had a lesser influence on local architects and builders. The hypothesis of this paper is that, although this influence existed, local networks were essen-tial in the task of connecting similar technical initiatives. To verify this hypothesis, several examples of build-ings from different Latin American countries, starting from the Casa Pizano, will be studied, and some possi-ble contacts between architects will be proposed.

More information

Item ID: 62329
DC Identifier: https://oa.upm.es/62329/
OAI Identifier: oai:oa.upm.es:62329
DOI: 10.1201/9780429506208-33
Deposited by: Memoria Investigacion
Deposited on: 10 Dec 2020 10:45
Last Modified: 10 Dec 2020 10:45
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