Non-invasive imaging shows no evidence of embolism repair after drought in tree species of two genera

Choat, Brendan and Nolf, Markus and Lopez Rodriguez, Rosa Ana and Peters, Jennifer M.R. and Carins-Murphy, Madeline R. and Creek, Danielle and Brodribb, Timothy J. (2019). Non-invasive imaging shows no evidence of embolism repair after drought in tree species of two genera. "Tree Physiology", v. 39 (n. 1); pp. 113-121. ISSN 0829-318X. https://doi.org/10.1093/treephys/tpy093.

Description

Title: Non-invasive imaging shows no evidence of embolism repair after drought in tree species of two genera
Author/s:
  • Choat, Brendan
  • Nolf, Markus
  • Lopez Rodriguez, Rosa Ana
  • Peters, Jennifer M.R.
  • Carins-Murphy, Madeline R.
  • Creek, Danielle
  • Brodribb, Timothy J.
Item Type: Article
Título de Revista/Publicación: Tree Physiology
Date: January 2019
ISSN: 0829-318X
Volume: 39
Subjects:
Freetext Keywords: cavitation; embolism; refilling; repair; xylem
Faculty: E.T.S.I. Montes, Forestal y del Medio Natural (UPM)
Department: Sistemas y Recursos Naturales
Creative Commons Licenses: Recognition - No derivative works - Non commercial

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Abstract

Drought stress can result in significant impairment of the plant hydraulic system via blockage of xylem conduits by gas emboli. Recovery after drought stress is an essential component of plant survival but is still a poorly understood process. In this study, we examined the capacity of woody species from two genera (Eucalyptus and Quercus) to refill embolized xylem vessels during a cycle of drought and recovery. Observations were made on intact plants of Eucalyptus calmudulensis, E. grandis, E. saligna and Quercus palustris using X-ray microtomography. We found no evidence of an effective xylem refilling mechanism in any of the plant species. Despite rehydration and recovery of plant water potential to near pre-drought levels, embolized vessels were not refilled up to 72 h after rewatering. In E. saligna, water droplets accumulated in previously air-filled vessels for a very small percentage of vessels. However, no instances of complete refilling that would restore embolized vessels to hydraulic function were observed. Our observations suggest that rapid refilling of embolized vessels after drought may not be a wide spread mechanism in woody plants and that embolism formed during drought represents long term cost to the plant hydraulic system.

Funding Projects

TypeCodeAcronymLeaderTitle
FP7624473HYDROPITINSTITUT NATIONAL DE RECHERCHE POUR L'AGRICULTURE, L'ALIMENTATION ET L'ENVIRONNEMENTPlasticity and adaptation of hydraulic traits to overcome climate change

More information

Item ID: 67949
DC Identifier: https://oa.upm.es/67949/
OAI Identifier: oai:oa.upm.es:67949
DOI: 10.1093/treephys/tpy093
Official URL: https://academic.oup.com/treephys/article/39/1/113/5077512
Deposited by: Memoria Investigacion
Deposited on: 30 Jul 2021 08:30
Last Modified: 30 Jul 2021 08:30
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