Rose petal effect: A subtle combination of nano-scale roughness and chemical variability

Almonte, Lisa and Pimentel, Carlos and Rodriguez Cañas, Enrique and Abad, José and Fernández Fernández, Victoria and Colchero, Jaime (2021). Rose petal effect: A subtle combination of nano-scale roughness and chemical variability. "Nano Select" ; pp. 1-13. https://doi.org/10.1002/nano.202100193.

Description

Title: Rose petal effect: A subtle combination of nano-scale roughness and chemical variability
Author/s:
  • Almonte, Lisa
  • Pimentel, Carlos
  • Rodriguez Cañas, Enrique
  • Abad, José
  • Fernández Fernández, Victoria
  • Colchero, Jaime
Item Type: Article
Título de Revista/Publicación: Nano Select
Date: 10 November 2021
Subjects:
Freetext Keywords: cuticle, fractal surface roughness, nanoscale wettability, plant surfaces, wetting parameter
Faculty: E.T.S.I. Montes, Forestal y del Medio Natural (UPM)
Department: Sistemas y Recursos Naturales
Creative Commons Licenses: Recognition

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Abstract

Rose petals may involve high water contact angles together with drop adhesion which are antagonistic wetting properties. Petal surfaces have a cuticle which is generally considered a continuous, hydrophobic lipid coating. The peculiar properties of rose petals are not fully understood and have been associated with high surface roughness at different scales. Here, the chemical and structural features of natural upper and lower petal surfaces are analyzed by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Both rose petal surfaces are statistically equivalent and have very high roughness at all scales from 5 nm to 10 μm. At the nanoscale, surfaces are fractal-like with an extreme fractal dimension close to df = 2.5. A major nanoscale variability is also observed which leads to large (nanoscale) wettability changes. To model the effect of roughness and chemical variability on wetting properties, a single wetting parameter is introduced. This approach enables to explain the Rose petal effect using a conceptually simple scheme. The described fundamental mechanisms leading to high contact angles together with drop adhesion can be applied to any natural and synthetic surface. Apart from introducing a new approach for characterizing a biological surface, these results can trigger new developments on nanoscale wetting and bio-inspired functional surfaces.

Funding Projects

TypeCodeAcronymLeaderTitle
Government of SpainPID2019-104272RB-C55UnspecifiedJaime ColcheroUnspecified
Government of SpainENE2016-79282-C5-4-RUnspecifiedUnspecifiedUnspecified
Government of SpainPID2019-104272RB-C52UnspecifiedUnspecifiedUnspecified
Government of SpainFJC2018-035820-IUnspecifiedUnspecifiedUnspecified
Government of SpainPTA2018-015394-IUnspecifiedUnspecifiedUnspecified

More information

Item ID: 69100
DC Identifier: https://oa.upm.es/69100/
OAI Identifier: oai:oa.upm.es:69100
DOI: 10.1002/nano.202100193
Official URL: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1002/nano.202100193
Deposited by: Victoria Fernández
Deposited on: 21 Nov 2021 17:56
Last Modified: 21 Nov 2021 17:56
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