Multiple avirulence paralogues in cereal powdery mildew fungi may contribute to parasite fitness and defeat of plant resistance

Sacristán Benayas, Soledad; Ridout, Christopher J.; Skamnioti, Pari; Porritt, Oliver; Jones, Jonathan D. G. y Brown, James K. M. (2006). Multiple avirulence paralogues in cereal powdery mildew fungi may contribute to parasite fitness and defeat of plant resistance. "The Plant Cell", v. 18 (n. null); pp. 2402-2414. ISSN 1040-4651.

Descripción

Título: Multiple avirulence paralogues in cereal powdery mildew fungi may contribute to parasite fitness and defeat of plant resistance
Autor/es:
  • Sacristán Benayas, Soledad
  • Ridout, Christopher J.
  • Skamnioti, Pari
  • Porritt, Oliver
  • Jones, Jonathan D. G.
  • Brown, James K. M.
Tipo de Documento: Artículo
Título de Revista/Publicación: The Plant Cell
Fecha: Septiembre 2006
Volumen: 18
Materias:
Escuela: E.T.S.I. Agrónomos (UPM) [antigua denominación]
Departamento: Biotecnologia [hasta 2014]
Licencias Creative Commons: Reconocimiento - Sin obra derivada - No comercial

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Resumen

Powdery mildews, obligate biotrophic fungal parasites on a wide range of important crops, can be controlled by plant resistance (R) genes, but these are rapidly overcome by parasite mutants evading recognition. It is unknown how this rapid evolution occurs without apparent loss of parasite fitness. R proteins recognize avirulence (AVR) molecules from parasites in a gene-for-gene manner and trigger defense responses. We identify AVRa10 and AVRk1 of barley powdery mildew fungus, Blumeria graminis f sp hordei (Bgh), and show that they induce both cell death and naccessibility when transiently expressed in Mla10 and Mlk1 barley (Hordeum vulgare) varieties, respectively. In contrast with other reported fungal AVR genes, AVRa10 and AVRk1 encode proteins that lack secretion signal peptides and enhance infection success on susceptible host plant cells. AVRa10 and AVRk1 belong to a large family with mayor que30 paralogues in the genome of Bgh, and homologous sequences are present in other formae speciales of the fungus infecting other grasses. Our findings imply that the mildew fungus has a repertoire of AVR genes, which may function as effectors and contribute to parasite virulence. Multiple copies of related but distinct AVR effector paralogues might enable populations of Bgh to rapidly overcome host R genes while maintaining virulence.

Más información

ID de Registro: 15375
Identificador DC: http://oa.upm.es/15375/
Identificador OAI: oai:oa.upm.es:15375
URL Oficial: http://www.plantcell.org/content/18/9/2402.abstract
Depositado por: Memoria Investigacion
Depositado el: 06 Jun 2013 14:25
Ultima Modificación: 21 Abr 2016 15:25
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