Effects of sheep and horse manure and pine bark amendments on metal distribution and chemical properties of contaminated mine soils.

Pérez Esteban, Javier and Escolástico, Consuelo and Masaguer Rodríguez, Alberto and Moliner Aramendia, Ana María (2012). Effects of sheep and horse manure and pine bark amendments on metal distribution and chemical properties of contaminated mine soils.. "European Journal of Soil Science", v. 63 ; pp. 733-742. ISSN 1351-0754. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2389.2012.01468.x.

Description

Title: Effects of sheep and horse manure and pine bark amendments on metal distribution and chemical properties of contaminated mine soils.
Author/s:
  • Pérez Esteban, Javier
  • Escolástico, Consuelo
  • Masaguer Rodríguez, Alberto
  • Moliner Aramendia, Ana María
Item Type: Article
Título de Revista/Publicación: European Journal of Soil Science
Date: October 2012
ISSN: 1351-0754
Volume: 63
Subjects:
Faculty: E.T.S.I. Agrónomos (UPM) [antigua denominación]
Department: Edafología [hasta 2014]
Creative Commons Licenses: Recognition - No derivative works - Non commercial

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Abstract

Mine soils usually contain large levels of heavy metals and poor fertility conditions which limit their reclamation and the application of phyto-remediation technologies. Two organic waste materials (pine bark compost and sheep and horse manure compost), with different pHs and varying degrees of humification and nutrient contents, were applied as amendments to assess their effects on copper (Cu) and zinc (Zn) bioavailability and on fertility conditions of mine soils. Soil samples collected from two abandoned mining areas near Madrid (Spain) were mixed with 0, 30 and 60 t ha?1 of the organic amendments. The concentrations of metals among the different mineral and organic fractions of soil were determined by several extraction procedures to study the metal distribution in the solid phase of the soil affected by the organic amendments. The results showed that the manure amendment increased the soil pH and the cation exchange capacity and enhanced the nutrient levels of these soils. The pine bark amendment decreased the soil pH and did not significantly change the nutrient status of soil. Soil pH, organic matter content and its degree of humification, which were altered by the amendments, were the main factors affecting Cu fractionation. Zn fractionation was mainly affected by soil pH. The addition of manure not only improved soil fertility, but also decreased metal bioavailability resulting in a reduction of metal toxicity. Conversely, pine bark amendment increased metal ioavailability. The use of sheep and horse manure could be a cost-effective practice for the restoration of contaminated mine soils.

More information

Item ID: 21998
DC Identifier: http://oa.upm.es/21998/
OAI Identifier: oai:oa.upm.es:21998
DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-2389.2012.01468.x
Official URL: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1365-2389.2012.01468.x/abstract
Deposited by: Memoria Investigacion
Deposited on: 05 Feb 2014 15:52
Last Modified: 19 Feb 2015 19:02
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