Human Factor in Resilience Systems

Paz, Iria and Paz Doel, Rosa Maria and Fernández, Elvira and Diez Gonzalez, Jose Javier (2014). Human Factor in Resilience Systems. In: "Engineering Geology for Society and Territory - Volume 7: Education, Professional Ethics and Public Recognition of Engineering Geology". Springer International Publishing, Suiza, pp. 157-160. ISBN 978-3-319-09302-4. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-09303-1_30.

Description

Title: Human Factor in Resilience Systems
Author/s:
  • Paz, Iria
  • Paz Doel, Rosa Maria
  • Fernández, Elvira
  • Diez Gonzalez, Jose Javier
Editor/s:
  • Lollino, Giorgio
  • Arattano, Massimo
  • Giardino, Marco
  • Oliveira, Ricardo
  • Peppoloni, Silvia
Item Type: Book Section
Title of Book: Engineering Geology for Society and Territory - Volume 7: Education, Professional Ethics and Public Recognition of Engineering Geology
Título de Revista/Publicación: Engineering Geology for Society and Territory
Date: August 2014
ISBN: 978-3-319-09302-4
ISSN: 978-3-319-10303-7
Volume: 7
Subjects:
Freetext Keywords: Natural/anthropic disasters; Post-traumatic stress: Human resilience; Capacity building; Risk management
Faculty: E.T.S.I. Caminos, Canales y Puertos (UPM)
Department: Ingeniería Civil: Transporte y Territorio
Creative Commons Licenses: Recognition - No derivative works - Non commercial

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Abstract

This paper shows the importance of a holistic comprehension of the Earth as a living planet, where man inhabits and is exposed to environmental incidences of different nature. The aim of the paper here summarized is a reflection on all these concepts and scientific considerations related to the important role of men in the handling of natural hazards. Our Planet is an unstable and dynamical system highly sensitive to initial conditions, as proposed by Chaos theory (González-Miranda 2004); it is a complex organic whole, which responds to minimal variations which can affect several natural phenomena such as plate tectonics, solar flares, fluid turbulences, landscape formation, forest fires, growth and migration of populations and biological evolution. This is known as the “butterfly effect” (Lorenz 1972), which means that a small change of the system causes a chain of events leading to large-scale unpredictable consequences. The aim of this work is dwelling on the importance of the knowledge of these natural and catastrophic geological, biological and human systems so much sensible to equilibrium conditions, to prevent, avoid and mend their effects, and to face them in a resilient way

More information

Item ID: 35822
DC Identifier: http://oa.upm.es/35822/
OAI Identifier: oai:oa.upm.es:35822
DOI: 10.1007/978-3-319-09303-1_30
Official URL: http://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-319-09303-1_30
Deposited by: Memoria Investigacion
Deposited on: 30 Jun 2015 15:33
Last Modified: 30 Jun 2015 15:33
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