Cuticle Structure in Relation to Chemical Composition: Re-assessing the Prevailing Model

Fernandez Fernandez, Victoria; Guzmán Delgado, Paula; Graça, José; Santos, Sara y Gil Sanchez, Luis (2016). Cuticle Structure in Relation to Chemical Composition: Re-assessing the Prevailing Model. "Frontiers in Plant Science", v. 7 (n. 427); pp. 1-14. https://doi.org/10.3389/fpls.2016.00427.

Descripción

Título: Cuticle Structure in Relation to Chemical Composition: Re-assessing the Prevailing Model
Autor/es:
  • Fernandez Fernandez, Victoria
  • Guzmán Delgado, Paula
  • Graça, José
  • Santos, Sara
  • Gil Sanchez, Luis
Tipo de Documento: Artículo
Título de Revista/Publicación: Frontiers in Plant Science
Fecha: 31 Marzo 2016
Volumen: 7
Materias:
Escuela: E.T.S.I. Montes, Forestal y del Medio Natural (UPM)
Departamento: Sistemas y Recursos Naturales
Licencias Creative Commons: Reconocimiento - Sin obra derivada

Texto completo

[img]
Vista Previa
PDF (Document Portable Format) - Se necesita un visor de ficheros PDF, como GSview, Xpdf o Adobe Acrobat Reader
Descargar (619kB) | Vista Previa

Resumen

The surface of most aerial plant organs is covered with a cuticle that provides protection against multiple stress factors including dehydration. Interest on the nature of this external layer dates back to the beginning of the 19th century and since then, several studies facilitated a better understanding of cuticular chemical composition and structure. The prevailing undertanding of the cuticle as a lipidic, hydrophobic layer which is independent from the epidermal cell wall underneath stems from the concept developed by Brongniart and von Mohl during the first half of the 19th century. Such early investigations on plant cuticles attempted to link chemical composition and structure with the existing technologies, and have not been directly challenged for decades. Beginning with a historical overview about the development of cuticular studies, this review is aimed at critically assessing the information available on cuticle chemical composition and structure, considering studies performed with cuticles and isolated cuticular chemical components. The concept of the cuticle as a lipid layer independent from the cell wall is subsequently challenged, based on the existing literature, and on new findings pointing toward the cell wall nature of this layer, also providing examples of different leaf cuticle structures. Finally, the need for a re-assessment of the chemical and structural nature of the plant cuticle is highlighted, considering its cell wall nature and variability among organs, species, developmental stages, and biotic and abiotic factors during plant growth.

Más información

ID de Registro: 39788
Identificador DC: http://oa.upm.es/39788/
Identificador OAI: oai:oa.upm.es:39788
Identificador DOI: 10.3389/fpls.2016.00427
URL Oficial: http://journal.frontiersin.org/article/10.3389/fpls.2016.00427/full
Depositado por: Victoria Fernández
Depositado el: 01 Abr 2016 07:31
Ultima Modificación: 01 Abr 2016 07:32
  • Open Access
  • Open Access
  • Sherpa-Romeo
    Compruebe si la revista anglosajona en la que ha publicado un artículo permite también su publicación en abierto.
  • Dulcinea
    Compruebe si la revista española en la que ha publicado un artículo permite también su publicación en abierto.
  • Recolecta
  • e-ciencia
  • Observatorio I+D+i UPM
  • OpenCourseWare UPM